Impacts, volcanism and mass extinction: random coincidence or cause and effect?

@article{Keller2005ImpactsVA,
  title={Impacts, volcanism and mass extinction: random coincidence or cause and effect?},
  author={Gerta Keller},
  journal={Australian Journal of Earth Sciences},
  year={2005},
  volume={52},
  pages={725 - 757}
}
  • G. Keller
  • Published 1 September 2005
  • Geography, Geology, Environmental Science
  • Australian Journal of Earth Sciences
Large impacts are credited with the most devastating mass extinctions in Earth's history and the Cretaceous – Tertiary (K/T) boundary impact is the strongest and sole direct support for this view. A review of the five largest Phanerozoic mass extinctions provides no support that impacts with craters up to 180 km in diameter caused significant species extinctions. This includes the 170 km-diameter Chicxulub impact crater regarded as 0.3 million years older than the K/T mass extinction. A second… 
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  • Environmental Science, Geography
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For the past three decades, the Alvarez impact theory of mass extinction, causally related to catastrophic meteorite impacts, has been recurrently applied to multiple extinction boundaries. However,
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  • G. Keller
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  • 2007
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  • G. Keller
  • Environmental Science, Geography
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New evidence concerning the age and biotic effects of the Chicxulub impact in NE Mexico
Abstract: In the 1990s the Chicxulub impact was linked to the K–T boundary by impact spherules at the base of a sandstone complex that was interpreted as an impact-generated tsunami deposit. Since
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