Impact of space weather on climate and habitability of terrestrial-type exoplanets

@article{Airapetian2019ImpactOS,
  title={Impact of space weather on climate and habitability of terrestrial-type exoplanets},
  author={Vladimir S. Airapetian and Rory Barnes and Ofer Cohen and Glyn A. Collinson and William C. Danchi and C. F. Dong and Anthony D. Del Genio and Kevin France and Katherine Garcia-Sage and Alex Glocer and Nat Gopalswamy and John Lee Grenfell and Guillaume Gronoff and Manuel G{\"u}del and K. Herbst and Wade G. Henning and C. H. Jackman and Meng Jin and Colin P. Johnstone and Lisa Kaltenegger and Christina Kay and K. Kobayashi and Weijia Kuang and G. Li and B. J. Lynch and Theresa L{\"u}ftinger and Janet G. Luhmann and Hiroyuki Maehara and Martin G. Mlynczak and Yuta Notsu and Rachel A. Osten and Ramses Mario Ramirez and Sarah Rugheimer and Markus Scheucher and Joshua E. Schlieder and Kazunari Shibata and Clara Sousa-Silva and Vlada Stamenkovi{\'c} and Robert J. Strangeway and Arcadi V. Usmanov and Panagiotis Vergados and Olga P. Verkhoglyadova and Aline A. Vidotto and Mary A. Voytek and Michael J. Way and Gary P. Zank and Yosuke A. Yamashiki},
  journal={International Journal of Astrobiology},
  year={2019},
  volume={19},
  pages={136 - 194}
}
Abstract The search for life in the Universe is a fundamental problem of astrobiology and modern science. The current progress in the detection of terrestrial-type exoplanets has opened a new avenue in the characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres and in the search for biosignatures of life with the upcoming ground-based and space missions. To specify the conditions favourable for the origin, development and sustainment of life as we know it in other worlds, we need to understand the nature… 
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