Impact of shear rate pattern on upper and lower limb conduit artery endothelial function in both spinal cord-injured and able-bodied men.

Abstract

NEW FINDINGS What is the central question of this study? This study addresses the following two central questions. (i) What is the impact of vascular deconditioning after spinal cord injury (SCI) on shear rate patterns and endothelial function? (ii) What is the impact of acutely altered shear rate on endothelial function in both SCI and able-bodied control subjects? What is the main finding and its importance? Two main findings in the present study were as follows: (i) reduced superficial femoral artery endothelial function in the SCI group; and (ii) acutely altered shear rate decreased endothelial function in both SCI and able-bodied control subjects. These findings may shed some light on future interventions taking into account these regulatory mechanisms. Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces vascular deconditioning below the level of the lesion and disrupts sympathetic innervation of blood vessels. It is unclear how these changes affect shear rate (SR) profiles and endothelial function when compared with able-bodied (AB) persons. Recent evidence suggests that periods of increased retrograde SR are associated with acute decreases in endothelial function, but is unknown how modified SR patterns influence sublesional vasculature in SCI. The present study examined the acute and chronic effects of altered SR patterns and oscillatory shear index on endothelial function via relative flow-mediated dilatation (FMD%) in both the brachial and superficial femoral arteries (BA and SFA, respectively) of eight individuals with SCI and eight matched AB control subjects. Baseline BA SR patterns and FMD% were similar between groups, while SFA anterograde SR was higher (P < 0.01) and FMD% lower (P = 0.04) in SCI versus AB subjects. Shear rate patterns were then acutely altered through the BA and SFA using a subsystolic cuff-inflation model. Bilateral FMD assessments were conducted before and after 30 min of unilateral inflation of a forearm or thigh blood pressure cuff to 75 mmHg. Cuff inflation resulted in concomitant increases in both anterograde (P < 0.05) and retrograde SR (P < 0.05), as well as acute decreases in FMD% (P < 0.05) in the BA and SFA in both groups. These results highlight that brief manipulation of SR patterns can acutely impair FMD% in conditions of both normal and altered sympathetic innervation and arterial remodelling. This information is crucial when designing strategies to combat impaired vascular function in both healthy and clinical populations.

DOI: 10.1113/EP085056

Cite this paper

@article{Zepetnek2015ImpactOS, title={Impact of shear rate pattern on upper and lower limb conduit artery endothelial function in both spinal cord-injured and able-bodied men.}, author={Julia Totosy de Zepetnek and David S. Ditor and Jason S Au and Maureen J MacDonald}, journal={Experimental physiology}, year={2015}, volume={100 10}, pages={1107-17} }