Impact of introduced honeybees, Apis mellifera, upon native bee communities in the Bonin (Ogasawara) Islands

@article{Kat1999ImpactOI,
  title={Impact of introduced honeybees, Apis mellifera, upon native bee communities in the Bonin (Ogasawara) Islands},
  author={M. Kat{\^o} and A. Shibata and T. Yasui and H. Nagamasu},
  journal={Researches on Population Ecology},
  year={1999},
  volume={41},
  pages={217-228}
}
The Bonin (Ogasawara) Islands are oceanic islands located in the northwest Pacific, and have ten native (nine endemic) bee species, all of which are nonsocial. [...] Key Result Both hived and feral honeybee colonies were active throughout the year, harvesting pollen of both native and alien flowers and from both entomophilous and anemophilous flowers. Honeybees strongly depended on the alien plants, especially during winter to spring when native melittophilous flowers were rare.Expand

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