Impact of chest wall and lung invasion on outcome of stage I-II Hodgkin's lymphoma after combined modality therapy.

Abstract

PURPOSE To examine the impact of extranodal chest wall and lung invasion on the prognosis of patients with clinical Stage I-II Hodgkin's lymphoma treated with combined modality therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS The outcome of 324 patients with clinical Stage I-II Hodgkin's lymphoma treated with combined modality therapy between 1981 and 1996 was analyzed. Twenty-two patients had chest wall invasion and 40 had invasion of lung parenchyma. The chemotherapy regimens used were ABVD in 182 patients (56%), MOPP/ABV(D) in 45 (14%), MOPP in 86 (27%), and other chemotherapy regimens in 11 patients (3%). This was followed by mantle/mediastinal radiotherapy (RT) in 163 patients (50%), extended-field RT in 135 patients (42%), and infradiaphragmatic RT in 26 patients (8%). The impact of chest wall and lung invasion on local relapse, disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival was examined. RESULTS After a median follow-up of 8.3 years, the 5-year cause-specific and overall survival rate of the entire cohort was 93% and 90%, respectively. Compared with patients with no extranodal involvement, patients with chest wall invasion had significantly worse local control (89% vs. 68%, p = 0.005), disease-free survival (84% vs. 59%, p = 0.016), and cause-specific survival (94% vs. 86%, p = 0.009). Overall survival was also worse among patients with chest wall invasion, but not significantly so (90% vs. 82%, p = 0.10). Among the 16 patients with chest wall invasion but without lung invasion, 7 progressed during treatment or relapsed, 6 with local failure (crude relapse rate 44%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 19-68%), and 5 died (crude death rate 31%, 95% CI 9-54%). After adjusting for other significant prognostic factors, patients with chest wall invasion had significantly worse local control (hazard ratio 2.8, 95% CI 1.2-6.3), disease-free survival (hazard ratio 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.8), and cause-specific survival (hazard ratio 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-6.8). Lung invasion was not significantly associated with any of the outcomes assessed. CONCLUSIONS Chest wall invasion is an adverse prognostic factor among clinical Stage I-II Hodgkin's lymphoma patients treated with combined modality therapy, although we did not find a worse outcome for patients with lung invasion. Efforts to reduce treatment intensity in these patients should be undertaken with caution, recognizing their increased risk of local relapse.

Cite this paper

@article{Hodgson2003ImpactOC, title={Impact of chest wall and lung invasion on outcome of stage I-II Hodgkin's lymphoma after combined modality therapy.}, author={D. C. Hodgson and Richard Tsang and Melania Pintilie and Alex Sun and Woodrow A Wells and Michael R Crump and Mary Krystyna Gospodarowicz}, journal={International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics}, year={2003}, volume={57 5}, pages={1374-81} }