Impact of cannabidiol on the acute memory and psychotomimetic effects of smoked cannabis: naturalistic study

@article{Morgan2010ImpactOC,
  title={Impact of cannabidiol on the acute memory and psychotomimetic effects of smoked cannabis: naturalistic study},
  author={C. Morgan and G. Schafer and T. Freeman and H. Curran},
  journal={British Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2010},
  volume={197},
  pages={285 - 290}
}
Background The two main constituents of cannabis, cannabidiol and δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), have opposing effects both pharmacologically and behaviourally when administered in the laboratory. Street cannabis is known to contain varying levels of each cannabinoid. Aims To study how the varying levels of cannabidiol and THC have an impact on the acute effects of the drug in naturalistic settings. Method Cannabis users (n = 134) were tested 7 days apart on measures of memory and… Expand
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