Impact of Quality of the Image, Orientation, and Similarity of the Stimuli on Visual Search for Faces

@article{Kuehn1994ImpactOQ,
  title={Impact of Quality of the Image, Orientation, and Similarity of the Stimuli on Visual Search for Faces},
  author={S M Kuehn and Pierre Jolicoeur},
  journal={Perception},
  year={1994},
  volume={23},
  pages={122 - 95}
}
Evidence from a series of visual-search experiments suggests that detecting an upright face amidst face-like distractors elicits a pattern of reaction times that is consistent with serial search. In four experiments the impact of orientation, number of stimuli in the display, and similarity of stimuli on search rates was examined. All displays were homogeneous. Trials were blocked by distractor type for three experiments. In the first experiment search rates for faces amidst identical faces… Expand
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