Impact of Host Tree on Forest Tent Caterpillar Performance and Offspring Overwintering Mortality

@inproceedings{Trudeau2010ImpactOH,
  title={Impact of Host Tree on Forest Tent Caterpillar Performance and Offspring Overwintering Mortality},
  author={Martin Trudeau and Yves Mauffette and Sophie Rochefort and Er-ning Han and {\'E}ric Bauce},
  booktitle={Environmental entomology},
  year={2010}
}
ABSTRACT One of the most damaging insect pests in deciduous forests of North America is the forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria Hübner. It can feed on a variety of plants, but trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michaux) is its preferred host and sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marshall) serves as a secondary one in the northern part of its distribution. Because host plant characteristics influence insect performance and survival, we evaluated the impact of trembling aspen and sugar maple… Expand
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