Impact Ejecta Horizon Within Late Precambrian Shales, Adelaide Geosyncline, South Australia

@article{Gostin1986ImpactEH,
  title={Impact Ejecta Horizon Within Late Precambrian Shales, Adelaide Geosyncline, South Australia},
  author={Victor A. Gostin and Peter W. Haines and Richard J. F. Jenkins and William Compston and Ian S. Williams},
  journal={Science},
  year={1986},
  volume={233},
  pages={198 - 200}
}
A solitary layer of shattered crustal rock fragments has been traced over a distance of 260 kilometers within folded 600-million-year-old Precambrian marine shales of the Adelaide Geosyncline, South Australia. The fragments consist entirely of acid to intermediate volcanics (approximately 1575 million years old) displaying shattered mineral grains, shock lamellae in quartz, and small shatter cones. Fragments reach 30 centimeters in diameter and show evidence of vertical fall emplacement… 

The Acraman Impact Structure: Source of Ejecta in Late Precambrian Shales, South Australia

TLDR
The Acraman structure is the largest probable impact structure known in Australia and is the likely source of dacitic ejecta found in late Precambrian marine shales some 300 kilometers to the east.

Zircon age evidence for the Late Precambrian Acraman ejecta blanket

The U‐Pb ages of zircons from a tuff‐like layer in the Late Precambrian Bunyeroo Formation in the central and southern Flinders Ranges, South Australia, show that the layer was not formed from

Discovery of distal ejecta from the 1850 Ma Sudbury impact event

A 25-70-cm-thick, laterally correlative layer near the contact between the Paleoproterozoic sedimentary Gunflint Iron Formation and overlying Rove Formation and between the Biwabik Iron Formation and

Spherules and Shard-Like Clasts from the Late Proterozoic Acraman Impact Ejecta Horizon, South Australia

— Spherules and irregular shard-like particles consisting of authigenic mineral phases have been identified in the Acraman impact ejecta horizon preserved within the late Proterozoic shales of the

Palaeomagnetic correlation of the Acraman impact structure and the Late Proterozoic Bunyeroo ejecta horizon, South Australia

Palaeomagnetic data for meltrock from the Acraman impact structure, South Australia, indicate a stable magnetization and a virtual geomagnetic pole that is in close agreement with the palaeomagnetic

Dating the Acraman asteroid impact, South Australia: the case for deep drilling the ‘hot shock’ zone of the central uplift

Abstract The deeply eroded Acraman structure in the Mesoproterozoic Gawler Range Volcanics, Gawler Craton, South Australia, ranks among the world’s largest known impact structures, with a transient

Chapter 66 Mid-Ediacaran ice-rafting in the Adelaide Geosyncline and Officer Basin, South Australia

Abstract Sedimentary features characteristic of ice-rafting are present in the Bunyeroo Formation (Wilpena Group) of the Adelaide Geosyncline and in the coeval Dey Dey Mudstone (Ungoolya Group) of

Petrology and microstructure of distal impact ejecta from the Flinders Ranges, Australia

Abstract— The Acraman impact ejecta from Bunyeroo Gorge in the central Flinders Ranges consist of clast‐bearing and sandy sublayers set in a shale host rock. A calculated transient crater diameter

Early Archean Spherule Beds in the Barberton Mountain Land, South Africa: Impact or Terrestrial Origin?

The origin of multiple spherule-rich layers of millimeter to meter width, all occurring within the transition from the Fig Tree to the Onverwacht Group of the Barberton Greenstone Belt in South

New records of Ediacaran Acraman ejecta in drillholes from the Stuart Shelf and Officer Basin, South Australia

Abstract— New occurrences of the Acraman impact ejecta layer were recently discovered in two South Australian drillholes, SCYW‐79 1a (Stuart Shelf) and Munta 1 (Officer Basin) using
...

References

SHOWING 1-3 OF 3 REFERENCES

The Acraman Impact Structure: Source of Ejecta in Late Precambrian Shales, South Australia

TLDR
The Acraman structure is the largest probable impact structure known in Australia and is the likely source of dacitic ejecta found in late Precambrian marine shales some 300 kilometers to the east.

We are indebted to our colleagues for valuable criticism and support. We thank A

    For a detailed discussion of the isotopic dating, see W. Compston, I