Immunology primer for neurosurgeons and neurologists part 2: Innate brain immunity

@inproceedings{Blaylock2013ImmunologyPF,
  title={Immunology primer for neurosurgeons and neurologists part 2: Innate brain immunity},
  author={Russell Lane Blaylock},
  booktitle={Surgical neurology international},
  year={2013}
}
Over the past several decades we have learned a great deal about microglia and innate brain immunity. While microglia are the principle innate immune cells, other cell types also play a role, including invading macrophages, astrocytes, neurons, and endothelial cells. The fastest reacting cell is the microglia and despite its name, resting microglia (also called ramified microglia) are in fact quite active. Motion photomicrographs demonstrate a constant movement of ramified microglial foot… CONTINUE READING
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