Immunological processes in malaria pathogenesis

@article{Schofield2005ImmunologicalPI,
  title={Immunological processes in malaria pathogenesis},
  author={Louis Schofield and Georges E. R. Grau},
  journal={Nature Reviews Immunology},
  year={2005},
  volume={5},
  pages={722-735}
}
Malaria is possibly the most serious infectious disease of humans, infecting 5–10% of the world's population, with 300–600 million clinical cases and more than 2 million deaths annually. Adaptive immune responses in the host limit the clinical impact of infection and provide partial, but incomplete, protection against pathogen replication; however, these complex immunological reactions can contribute to disease and fatalities. So, appropriate regulation of immune responses to malaria lies at… Expand
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