Immunizing against the American Other: Racism, Nationalism, and Gender in U.S.-Icelandic Military Relations during the Cold War

@article{Ingimundarson2004ImmunizingAT,
  title={Immunizing against the American Other: Racism, Nationalism, and Gender in U.S.-Icelandic Military Relations during the Cold War},
  author={V. Ingimundarson},
  journal={Journal of Cold War Studies},
  year={2004},
  volume={6},
  pages={65-88}
}
The 1951 U.S. -Icelandic Defense Agreement paved the way for a permanent U.S. military presence at the Keflavik base in Iceland, an outpost that played a crucial role in U.S. strategy during the Cold War. The article explores two gender-related aspects of the U.S. -Icelandic Cold War relationship:the restrictions on off-base movements of U.S. soldiers, and the secret ban imposed by the Icelandic government on the stationing of black U.S. troops in Iceland. These practices were meant to protect… Expand
12 Citations
Gendering the American Enemy in Early Cold War Soviet Films (1946–1953)
Going to Eden: Nordic exceptionalism and the image of blackness in Iceland
...
1
2
...