Immune dysregulation and self‐reactivity in schizophrenia: Do some cases of schizophrenia have an autoimmune basis?

@article{Jones2005ImmuneDA,
  title={Immune dysregulation and self‐reactivity in schizophrenia: Do some cases of schizophrenia have an autoimmune basis?},
  author={Amanda L. Jones and Bryan J. Mowry and Michael P. Pender and Judith M Greer},
  journal={Immunology and Cell Biology},
  year={2005},
  volume={83}
}
Schizophrenia affects 1% of the world's population, but its cause remains obscure. Numerous theories have been proposed regarding the cause of schizophrenia, ranging from developmental or neurodegenerative processes or neurotransmitter abnormalities to infectious or autoimmune processes. In this review, findings suggestive of immune dysregulation and reactivity to self in patients with schizophrenia are examined with reference to criteria for defining whether or not a human disease is… Expand
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