Immigration and Crime in the New Destinations, 2000–2007: A Test of the Disorganizing Effect of Migration

@article{Ferraro2016ImmigrationAC,
  title={Immigration and Crime in the New Destinations, 2000–2007: A Test of the Disorganizing Effect of Migration},
  author={Vincent Ferraro},
  journal={Journal of Quantitative Criminology},
  year={2016},
  volume={32},
  pages={23-45}
}
  • Vincent Ferraro
  • Published 1 March 2016
  • Political Science
  • Journal of Quantitative Criminology
ObjectivesDrawing from a social disorganization perspective, this research addresses the effect of immigration on crime within new destinations—places that have experienced significant recent growth in immigration over the last two decades.MethodsFixed effects regression analyses are run on a sample of n = 1252 places, including 194 new destinations, for the change in crime from 2000 to the 2005–2007 period. Data are drawn from the 2000 Decennial Census, 2005–2007 American Community Survey, and… Expand
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