Immigration, Economic Disadvantage, and Homicide

@article{Akins2009ImmigrationED,
  title={Immigration, Economic Disadvantage, and Homicide},
  author={Scott Akins and Rub{\'e}n G. Rumbaut and Richard Stansfield},
  journal={Homicide Studies},
  year={2009},
  volume={13},
  pages={307 - 314}
}
In this article, the effect of recent immigration on homicide rates across city of Austin, Texas census tracts is examined. Since 1980, Austin's recent immigrant population increased by more than 580% across the metropolitan area and it is now considered a “pre-emerging” immigrant gateway city to the United States. Therefore the changing population dynamics in Austin provide an excellent opportunity to study the effect of recent immigration on homicide. After controlling for structural… 
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One of the many contributions of Land, McCall, and Cohen’s landmark study was the confirmation of a long-held view in criminology—that deprivation raises homicide. Yet recent literature finds that
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