Immature Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitizing lizards from the southeastern U.S.A.

@article{Oliver1993ImmatureIS,
  title={Immature Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitizing lizards from the southeastern U.S.A.},
  author={James H. Oliver and Gregory A. Cummins and Martha Sasser Joiner},
  journal={The Journal of parasitology},
  year={1993},
  volume={79 5},
  pages={
          684-9
        }
}
Preserved museum specimens of 13 lizard and 3 snake species common in the southeastern U.S.A. were examined for immature Ixodes scapularis Say ticks. Five Eumeces and 4 Ophisaurus lizard species yielded an infestation prevalence of 17.8% for species of Eumeces and 29.0% for species of Ophisaurus. Mean intensity of larvae and nymphs was 7.1 and 2.7, respectively, for species of Eumeces, and 6.3 and 1.4, respectively, for species of Ophisaurus. Collection dates of the lizards ranged from January… 
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