Imitation of Facial and Manual Gestures by Human Neonates

@article{Meltzoff1977ImitationOF,
  title={Imitation of Facial and Manual Gestures by Human Neonates},
  author={Andrew N. Meltzoff and M. Keith Moore},
  journal={Science},
  year={1977},
  volume={198},
  pages={75 - 78}
}
Infants between 12 and 21 days of age can imitate both facial and manual gestures; this behavior cannot be explained in terms of either conditioning or innate releasing mechanisms. Such imitation implies that human neonates can equate their own unseen behaviors with gestures they see others perform. 

Discrimination and imitation of facial expression by neonates.

Human neonates (average age, 36 hours) discriminated three facial expressions posed by a live model as evidenced by diminished visual fixation on each face over trials and renewed fixations to the presentation of a different face.

Imitation: Not in Our Genes

  • C. Heyes
  • Psychology, Biology
    Current Biology
  • 2016

Imitation of facial gestures by an infant chimpanzee

The present study clearly demonstrated that the infant chimpanzee could imitate human facial gestures in a particular period.

Imitation of Non-Speech Oral Gestures by 8-Month-Old Infants

8-month-old infants are capable of producing goal-directed oral gestures by matching the articulatory organ of an adult model, consistent with predictions from Articulatory Phonology.

Imitation in Newborn Infants: Exploring the Range of Gestures Imitated and the Underlying Mechanisms.

The results established that newborn imitation is not constrained to a few privileged oral movements, and support Meltzoff and Moore's hypothesis that early imitation is mediated by an active cross-modal matching process.

Neonatal imitation predicts how infants engage with faces.

Investigating whether neonatal imitation predicts facial viewing patterns in infant rhesus macaques found that macaque infants generally looked equally at the eyes and mouth during gesture presentation, but only lipsmacking-imitators showed significantly more looking at the Eyes of the neutral still face.

Learning to imitate individual finger movements by the human neonate.

The lateralized behavioural pattern suggests the involvement of a right lateralized neural network, and the mechanisms described in this study might fulfil the criteria for filial imprinting.

Social Cognition: Evolutionary History of Emotional Engagements with Infants

  • K. Bard
  • Psychology
    Current Biology
  • 2009
...

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Imitation of facial and manual gestures by human neonates

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