Imitation interacts with one's second-language phonology but it does not operate cross-linguistically

@inproceedings{Podlipsk2013ImitationIW,
  title={Imitation interacts with one's second-language phonology but it does not operate cross-linguistically},
  author={V{\'a}clav Jon{\'a}s Podlipsk{\'y} and S{\'a}rka Sim{\'a}ckov{\'a} and Katerina Chl{\'a}dkov{\'a}},
  booktitle={INTERSPEECH},
  year={2013}
}
This study explored effects of simultaneous use of late bilinguals’ languages on their second-language (L2) pronunciation. We tested (1) if bilinguals effectively inhibit the first language (L1) when simultaneously processing L1 and L2, (2) if bilinguals, like natives, imitate subphonemic variation, (3) if bilinguals’ imitation operates crosslinguistically, and (4) if imitation interacts with phonological structure. Sixteen L1-Czech L2-English speakers heard stimuli with two factors manipulated… CONTINUE READING

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