Imaging studies on sex differences in the lateralization of language

@article{Kansaku2001ImagingSO,
  title={Imaging studies on sex differences in the lateralization of language},
  author={Kenji Kansaku and Shigeru Kitazawa},
  journal={Neuroscience Research},
  year={2001},
  volume={41},
  pages={333-337}
}

Sex difference in language lateralization may be task-dependent.

Sir, It has been proposed that language is more strongly lateralized in males than in females. Recent imaging studies, however, have yielded a variety of apparently contradictory observations. A

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Do women really have more bilateral language representation than men? A meta-analysis of functional imaging studies.

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A meta-analysis of studies that assessed language activity with functional imaging in healthy men and women concluded that differences in language lateralization underlie the general sex differences in cognitive performance, and the neuronal basis for these cognitive sex differences remains elusive.
...

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