Imaging by Elemental and Molecular Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Uptake of an Arsenolipid in the Brain of Drosophila melanogaster.

Abstract

Arsenic-containing lipids (arsenolipids) are natural products of marine organisms such as fish, invertebrates, and algae, many of which are important seafoods. A major group of arsenolipids, namely, the arsenic-containing hydrocarbons (AsHC), have recently been shown to be cytotoxic to human liver and bladder cells, a result that has stimulated interest in the chemistry and toxicology of these compounds. In this study, elemental laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and molecular matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-)MS were used to image and quantify the uptake of an AsHC in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. Using these two complementary methods, both an enrichment of arsenic and the presence of the AsHC in the brain were revealed, indicating that the intact arsenolipid had crossed the blood-brain barrier. Simultaneous acquisition of quantitative elemental concentrations and molecular distributions could allow new insight into organ-specific enrichment and possible transportation processes of arsenic-containing bioactive compounds in living organisms.

DOI: 10.1021/acs.analchem.6b00333

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@article{Niehoff2016ImagingBE, title={Imaging by Elemental and Molecular Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Uptake of an Arsenolipid in the Brain of Drosophila melanogaster.}, author={Ann-Christin Niehoff and Jacqueline Schulz and Jens Soltwisch and Soeren Meyer and Hans Kettling and Michael R. Sperling and Astrid Jeibmann and Klaus Dreisewerd and Kevin A. Francesconi and T Schwerdtle and Uwe Karst}, journal={Analytical chemistry}, year={2016}, volume={88 10}, pages={5258-63} }