• Corpus ID: 117098777

Imaging Properties of Two-Dimensional Microlenses

@article{Smolyaninova2010ImagingPO,
  title={Imaging Properties of Two-Dimensional Microlenses},
  author={Vera N. Smolyaninova and Igor I. Smolyaninov and Alexander V. Kildishev and Vladimir M. Shalaev},
  journal={arXiv: Optics},
  year={2010}
}
Despite strong experimental and theoretical evidence supporting superresolution imaging based on microlenses, imaging mechanisms involved are not well understood. Based on the transformation optics approach, we demonstrate that microlenses may act as two-dimensional fisheye or Eaton lenses. An asymmetric Eaton lens may exhibit considerable image magnification, which has been confirmed experimentally. 

Figures from this paper

References

SHOWING 1-9 OF 9 REFERENCES

Perfect imaging without negative refraction

Perfect imaging has been believed to rely on negative refraction, but here we show that an ordinary positively refracting optical medium may form perfect images as well. In particular, we establish a

Negative refraction makes a perfect lens

  • Pendry
  • Physics
    Physical review letters
  • 2000
The authors' simulations show that a version of the lens operating at the frequency of visible light can be realized in the form of a thin slab of silver, which resolves objects only a few nanometers across.

Far-field optical microscopy with a nanometer-scale resolution based on the in-plane image magnification by surface plasmon polaritons.

A new far-field optical microscopy capable of reaching nanometer-scale resolution is developed using the in-plane image magnification by surface plasmon polaritons. This approach is based on the

Near-field focusing and magnification through self-assembled nanoscale spherical lenses

It is well known that a lens-based far-field optical microscope cannot resolve two objects beyond Abbe’s diffraction limit. Recently, it has been demonstrated that this limit can be overcome by

Optical Conformal Mapping

A general recipe for the design of media that create perfect invisibility within the accuracy of geometrical optics is developed, which can be applied to escape detection by other electromagnetic waves or sound.

Controlling Electromagnetic Fields

This work shows how electromagnetic fields can be redirected at will and proposes a design strategy that has relevance to exotic lens design and to the cloaking of objects from electromagnetic fields.

Anisotropic metamaterials emulated by tapered waveguides: application to electromagnetic cloaking

  • Phys. Rev. Letters
  • 2009

Shalaev, “Anisotropic metamaterials emulated by tapered waveguides: application to electromagnetic cloaking

  • Phys. Rev. Letters 103,
  • 2009