Imagined spatial transformations of one's hands and feet

@article{Parsons1987ImaginedST,
  title={Imagined spatial transformations of one's hands and feet},
  author={Lawrence M. Parsons},
  journal={Cognitive Psychology},
  year={1987},
  volume={19},
  pages={178-241}
}
  • L. Parsons
  • Published 1 April 1987
  • Psychology
  • Cognitive Psychology
Imagined spatial transformation of one's body.
  • L. Parsons
  • Psychology
    Journal of experimental psychology. General
  • 1987
TLDR
The study of the judgment of whether a human body part belongs to the left or right half of the body and the imagined spatial transformation of one's body suggests that temporal and kinematic properties of imagined spatial transformations are more object-specific than could be previously assumed.
Telling right from right: the influence of handedness in the mental rotation of hands
TLDR
For left-hand stimuli, the consistent performance across groups does not provide support for embodied experience, while world knowledge might influence all groups similarly, while the within-group variation for mixed-handed people supports embodied experience in the hand MRT, likely processed through visual-proprioceptive integration.
Mental rotation of letters, body parts and complex scenes: separate or common mechanisms?
Neural correlates of two imagined egocentric transformations
Evidence for a Disturbance of the Body Schema in Neglect
  • H. Coslett
  • Psychology, Biology
    Brain and Cognition
  • 1998
TLDR
It is suggested that neglect may be associated with a disruption of, or failure to attend to, the body schema, an internal three-dimensional, dynamic representation of the spatial and biomechanical properties of one's body.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 35 REFERENCES
Imagined spatial transformation of one's body.
  • L. Parsons
  • Psychology
    Journal of experimental psychology. General
  • 1987
TLDR
The study of the judgment of whether a human body part belongs to the left or right half of the body and the imagined spatial transformation of one's body suggests that temporal and kinematic properties of imagined spatial transformations are more object-specific than could be previously assumed.
Mental transformations in the identification of left and right hands.
  • L. Cooper, R. Shepard
  • Psychology
    Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance
  • 1975
TLDR
It is proposed that subjects determine whether a visually presented hand is left or right by moving a mental "phantom" of one of their own hands into the portrayed position and by then comparing its imagined appearance against the appearance of the externally presented hand.
Spatial Transformations used in Imagination, Perception and Action
The work described in this chapter was originally motivated by an interest in understanding a fundamental unsolved problem in human perception—how we recognize an object, in view of the fact that
Kinesthetic aspects of mental representations in the identification of left and right hands
TLDR
Kinesthetic aspects of mental representations of one’s own hands were investigated, in which finger position and wrist rotation varied, and each version occurred as a left and as a right hand, and could appear in any one of eight directions in the picture plane.
Mental transformations and visual comparison processes: effects of complexity and similarity.
  • L. Cooper
  • Psychology
    Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance
  • 1976
TLDR
The time needed to prepare for the presentation of the test form increased linearly with the angular departure of the indicated orientation from a previously learned position, which suggests that, in accordance with instructions, subjects performed a mental rotation in preparing for the upcoming test shape.
Demonstration of a mental analog of an external rotation
Subjects imagined a designated two-dimensional shape rotating within a blank, circular field at a self-determined rate. At some point during the mental rotation, a test shape was presented at one of
Mental rotation of random two-dimensional shapes
Mental imagery and the third dimension.
  • S. Pinker
  • Psychology
    Journal of experimental psychology. General
  • 1980
TLDR
The time subjects took to scan between objects in a mental image was used to infer the sorts of geometric information that images preserve, and it is argued that imagery and perception share some representational structures but that mental image scanning is a process distinct from eye movements or eye-movement commands.
Perceived spatial organization of cutaneous patterns on surfaces of the human body in various positions.
The perceived spatial organization of cutaneous patterns was examined in three experiments. People identified letters or numbers traced on surfaces of their body when the relative spatial
...
1
2
3
4
...