Images, imagination, and movement: pictorial representations and their development in the work of James Gibson.

Abstract

For more than 30 years James Gibson studied pictures and he studied motion, particularly the relationship between movement through an environment and its visual consequences. For the latter, he also struggled with how best to present his ideas to students and fellow researchers, and employed various representations and formats. This article explores the… (More)

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@article{Cutting2000ImagesIA, title={Images, imagination, and movement: pictorial representations and their development in the work of James Gibson.}, author={James Cutting}, journal={Perception}, year={2000}, volume={29 6}, pages={635-48} }