If Science Had Come First: A Billion Person Fable for the Ages (A Reply to Comments)

@article{Goodkind2018IfSH,
  title={If Science Had Come First: A Billion Person Fable for the Ages (A Reply to Comments)},
  author={Daniel Goodkind},
  journal={Demography},
  year={2018},
  volume={55},
  pages={743-768}
}
I am honored to have this opportunity to reply to three comments on my article published in Demography (Goodkind 2017a), which I wrote as an independent researcher. My primary goal was to estimate the demographic impact of China’s birth planning program, the most determined attempt to control the size of the human species that the world has ever known. The central estimates were based on a 16-country comparative model of fertility decline proposed by two of the commenters themselves (Wang Feng… 
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