Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (Pseudotumor cerebri)

@article{Wall2008IdiopathicIH,
  title={Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (Pseudotumor cerebri)},
  author={Michael Wall},
  journal={Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports},
  year={2008},
  volume={8},
  pages={87-93}
}
  • M. Wall
  • Published 29 March 2008
  • Medicine
  • Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports
Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri, is a disorder of elevated intracranial pressure of unknown cause. Patients present with daily headache, pulse-synchronous tinnitus, transient visual obscurations, papilledema with its associated visual loss, and diplopia from sixth nerve paresis. Many disease associations have been alleged, but few besides obesity, hypervitaminosis A and related compounds, steroid withdrawal, and female gender have been proven… Expand
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The epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of IIH in adults and pediatric patients is reviewed, with a focus on young obese females of child-bearing age. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
The intent of this educational manuscript is to review the clinical presentation of pseudotumor cerebri patients and discuss the medical, surgical, and endovascular treatment options for this disease. Expand
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TLDR
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  • A. Lekoubou, W. Feng
  • Medicine
  • Cerebral Venous System in Acute and Chronic Brain Injuries
  • 2018
TLDR
The suggested association between cerebral transverse sinus stenosis/hypoplasia and certain IIH cases is examined and future research would need to focus on defining the clinical and radiological profile of individuals who will best benefit from CVS stenting. Expand
Secondary pseudotumour cerebri in a patient undergoing sexual reassignment therapy
TLDR
The original diagnostic criteria were formulated in 1937 by Walter Dandy, who described benign intracranial hypertension as the presence of increased ICP, normal cerebrospinal fluid findings and no sign of a brain tumour on ventriculography. Expand
Management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension in parturients: anesthetic considerations
TLDR
Although IIH is rare, there are special considerations for anesthetic management in the parturient, and uncal herniation has not been reported to occur in patients with IIH. Expand
The Girl With the Headache and Double Vision
TLDR
A case of a 17 year old female who presented to her primary care physician (PCP) for evaluation of a headache: no evidence of mass lesion or abnormal enhancement in the brain parenchyma, neither evidences of acute intracranial pathology was present. Expand
Benign Intracranial Hypertension: A Diagnostic Dilemma
TLDR
This report presents three representative cases of BIH highlighting many of the newer advances in both diagnosis and treatment of this perplexing disorder. Expand
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TLDR
This report describes a 16-year-old girl who developed idiopathic intracranial hypertension while taking minocycline for acne, and this complication requires vigilance to protect against potential vision loss. Expand
Symptoms and disease associations in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (pseudotumor cerebri)
TLDR
It is concluded that previous studies of IIH, mostly uncontrolled and retrospective, have underestimated the frequency of symptoms in IIH patients and reported chance and spurious associations with common medical conditions and medications. Expand
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Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (pseudotumor cerebri) is a condition that occurs predominantly in obese women. It consists of elevated spinal fluid pressure, normal spinal fluid contents,Expand
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  • Medicine
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TLDR
The headache profile of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH, pseudotumour cerebri) has not been prospectively studied and patients characteristically noted a pulsatile headache of gradually increasing intensity that had awakened them. Expand
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TLDR
Monitoring of newly-diagnosed patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension over a period of 2 to 39 months found visual loss in patients with IIH is common and is often reversible, and improvement of visual field grade was significantly associated only with weight gain during the year before diagnosis. Expand
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TLDR
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The role of weight loss and acetazolamide in the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (pseudotumor cerebri)
TLDR
Almost 6% weight loss was associated with resolution of marked papilledema in these authors' patients, and the benefit of acetazolamide in IIH is questioned since weight loss appeared to have been the catalyst for reducing the severity of papillema. Expand
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