Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis

@article{Blauwet2012IdiopathicGC,
  title={Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis},
  author={Lori A. Blauwet and Leslie T. Cooper},
  journal={Heart Failure Reviews},
  year={2012},
  volume={18},
  pages={733-746}
}
Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis (GCM) and cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are rare disorders that cause cardiomyopathy, often with ventricular arrhythmias or heart block. Infection, autoimmune processes, and genetics have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases, but the etiology for both diseases is likely a complex multifactorial process. Both GCM and CS are generally progressive despite treatment with standard heart failure and arrhythmia therapies. Making the diagnosis of GCM or… Expand
Management of Patients With Giant Cell Myocarditis: JACC Review Topic of the Week.
TLDR
Combination immunosuppressive therapy, along with guideline-directed medical therapy, has led to a paradigm shift in the management of giant cell myocarditis resulting in an improvement in overall and transplant-free survival. Expand
Small Steps for Idiopathic Giant Cell Myocarditis
TLDR
IGCM is a rare disease causing progressive myocarditis characterized by myocardial necrosis and giant cells that can recur in the transplanted heart resulting in death or the need for retransplant. Expand
Giant Cell and Hypersensitivity Myocarditis
Giant cell myocarditis (GCM) and hypersensitivity myocarditis (HSM) are both rare inflammatory diseases of the myocardium that are rapidly progressive and carry poor prognosis. Histologically bothExpand
Cardiac Sarcoidosis and Giant Cell Myocarditis: Actually, 2 Ends of the Same Disease?
TLDR
Findings from the MIDFIN (Myocardial Inflammatory Diseases in Finland) Study are reported, which identified 311 patients with CS and 25 patients with GCM and included patients at the severe end of the CS spectrum, who have clinically manifest cardiac involvement. Expand
Fulminant myocarditis: Characteristics, treatment, and outcomes
TLDR
This review aimed to provide an updated practical definition of FM, including essentials in the diagnosis and management of the disease, and the outcome of FM was critically revised according to the current published registries focusing on the topic. Expand
Arrhythmia in Cardiac Sarcoidosis.
TLDR
The appropriate selection of patients for ablation is likely more helpful in the setting of a myocardial scar substrate versus arrhythmia driven by active inflammation, and further studies investigating CS pathophysiology, the pathway to diagnosis, arrhythmogenic manifestations, and SCD risk stratification will be crucial to reduce the high morbidity and mortality of this disease. Expand
Imaging of Inflammation in Unexplained Cardiomyopathy.
TLDR
The current and projected use of various imaging modalities, including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and nuclear imaging, are focused on to better define inflammatory cardiomyopathies and aid in their management. Expand
Imaging of In fl ammation in Unexplained Cardiomyopathy
Myocarditis is a recognized but underdiagnosed cause of cardiomyopathy due to its wide clinical spectrum and nonspecific presentation. Accurate diagnosis is important because 25% of patients withExpand
Management of fulminant myocarditis: A diagnosis in search of its etiology but with therapeutic options
TLDR
Clinical management of the disease entity at the acute stage involves hemodynamic monitoring in an intensive care unit or similar setting and immunosuppressive treatment is beneficial; for viral myocarditis, IVIg can resolve the inflammation, reduce the viral load, and even eradicate the microbial agent. Expand
Acute and Fulminant Myocarditis: a Pragmatic Clinical Approach to Diagnosis and Treatment
TLDR
The clinical features of acute myocarditis are reviewed, including its fulminant presentation, and a pragmatic approach to the diagnosis and treatment is presented, considering indications of American and European Scientific Statements and recent data derived by large contemporary registries. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 153 REFERENCES
Giant Cell Myocarditis in Children.
  • L. Cooper
  • Medicine
  • Progress in pediatric cardiology
  • 2007
TLDR
In the multicenter GCM registry, 4 of 63 cases (6%) occurred in subjects less than age 19, and these 4 cases are summarized and the findings related to other published reports are summarized. Expand
Ventricular assist surprise: giant cell myocarditis or sarcoidosis?
TLDR
The outcome of these patients with idiopathic giant cell myocarditis was poorer than that of other patients with GCM who underwent transplantation without prior requirement of a ventricular assist device (VAD). Expand
Pediatric Giant Cell Myocarditis and Orbital Myositis
TLDR
If orbital myositis is diagnosed in a patient, regardless of age, cardiac function should be closely monitored to detect myocarditis, which may affect the overall outcome. Expand
Cardiac Sarcoidosis and Giant Cell Myocarditis as Causes of Atrioventricular Block in Young and Middle-Aged Adults
TLDR
CS and GCM explain ≥25% of initially unexplained AVB in young and middle-aged adults undergoing pacemaker implantation for AVB, and these patients are at high risk for adverse cardiac events. Expand
Cardiac transplantation for pediatric giant cell myocarditis.
  • B. Das, M. Recto, +5 authors E. Austin
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of heart and lung transplantation : the official publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation
  • 2006
TLDR
A 13-year-old girl who presented with ventricular tachycardia and rapid hemodynamic deterioration that required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridge to heart transplantation is described. Expand
The role of right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy for idiopathic giant cell myocarditis.
TLDR
The sensitivity of right ventricular EMB is high in patients with GCM who have early disease presentation and a fulminant clinical course, and may be used selectively to distinguish fulminants heart failure caused by GCM from other causes in which the prognosis may differ. Expand
Idiopathic giant-cell myocarditis--natural history and treatment. Multicenter Giant Cell Myocarditis Study Group Investigators.
TLDR
Giant-cell myocarditis is a disease of relatively young, predominantly healthy adults that usually die of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia unless cardiac transplantation is performed and is the treatment of choice for most patients. Expand
Cardiac sarcoidosis: spectrum of MRI features.
  • O. Vignaux
  • Medicine
  • AJR. American journal of roentgenology
  • 2005
TLDR
The value of T2-weighted and gadopentetate dimeglumine–enhanced MRI for diagnosing cardiac sarcoidosis has been recently emphasized, whereas the usefulness of other noninvasive imaging methods such as echocardiography and thallium myocardial scanning is limited because of either low sensitivity or specificity. Expand
Cardiac sarcoidosis.
TLDR
All patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis should be screened for cardiac involvement and patients with CS and symptoms such as syncope need an aggressive workup for a potentially life-threatening etiology, and often require implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy. Expand
A clinical and histopathologic comparison of cardiac sarcoidosis and idiopathic giant cell myocarditis.
TLDR
Transplant-free survival is better for patients with CS than for IGCM diagnosed by EMB, and presentation with heart failure predicted I GCM, and presentation with heart block or more than nine weeks of symptoms predicted CS. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...