Idioms of Madness and Colonial Boundaries: The Case of the European and “Native” Mentally Ill in Early Nineteenth-Century British India

@article{Ernst1997IdiomsOM,
  title={Idioms of Madness and Colonial Boundaries: The Case of the European and “Native” Mentally Ill in Early Nineteenth-Century British India},
  author={Waltraud Ernst},
  journal={Comparative Studies in Society and History},
  year={1997},
  volume={39},
  pages={153 - 181}
}
  • W. Ernst
  • Published 1 January 1997
  • History
  • Comparative Studies in Society and History
THE COLONIZATION OF MADNESS Lunatic asylums began to emerge in India towards the end of the eighteenth century. Although some critics expressed concern as to the propriety of an institutional response to mental illness, they formed a small minority. During a period when the asylum took on “a status as panacea equivalent to the steam engine, the rights of man, or the spread of universal knowledge” (Bynum et al. 1988:3), medical and public opinion had come to believe that madness could be cured… 
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