Ideology and Subversion in the Shakespearean Set Speech

@article{Cartelli1986IdeologyAS,
  title={Ideology and Subversion in the Shakespearean Set Speech},
  author={Thomas Cartelli},
  journal={ELH},
  year={1986},
  volume={53},
  pages={1}
}
In the opening chapter of Radical Tragedy, Jonathan Dollimore makes a distinction in regard to Montaigne that can be profitably applied to Shakespeare as well. Contending that "We need to recognise . . . how a writer can be intellectually radical without necessarily being politically so,"' Dollimore broaches a possibility that is seldom acknowledged by Shakespeareans who assume that the playwright's apparent political conservatism is firmly rooted in his identification with the received ideas… Expand
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