Identifying empirically supported treatments: what if we didn't?

@article{Beutler1998IdentifyingES,
  title={Identifying empirically supported treatments: what if we didn't?},
  author={Larry E. Beutler},
  journal={Journal of consulting and clinical psychology},
  year={1998},
  volume={66 1},
  pages={
          113-20
        }
}
  • L. Beutler
  • Published 1 February 1998
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of consulting and clinical psychology
The conclusion of the Division 12 Task Force's report on empirically supported treatments raises 3 questions: (a) Is it desirable for the profession to specify what treatments are effective? (b) Do the criteria, either selected by the Task Force or modified by others, represent a reasonable way of identifying effective treatments? (c) Would different and less controversial conclusions have been reached if the criteria used were broadened to include naturalistic and quasi-experimental studies… Expand
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