Identifying constraints in the evolution of primate societies

@article{Thierry2013IdentifyingCI,
  title={Identifying constraints in the evolution of primate societies},
  author={Bernard Thierry},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2013},
  volume={368}
}
  • B. Thierry
  • Published 19 May 2013
  • Biology
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
The evolutionary study of social systems in non-human primates has long been focused on ecological determinants. The predictive value of socio-ecological models remains quite low, however, in particular because such equilibrium models cannot integrate the course of history. The use of phylogenetic methods indicates that many patterns of primate societies have been conserved throughout evolutionary history. For example, the study of social relations in macaques revealed that their social systems… 

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