• Corpus ID: 44367226

Identifying common-source driven correlations in resting-state fMRI via laminar-specific analysis in the human visual cortex

@inproceedings{Polimeni2009IdentifyingCD,
  title={Identifying common-source driven correlations in resting-state fMRI via laminar-specific analysis in the human visual cortex},
  author={J. Polimeni and Thomas Witzel and Bruce R. Fischl and Douglas N. Greve and Lawrence L. Wald},
  year={2009}
}
J. R. Polimeni, T. Witzel, B. Fischl, D. N. Greve, and L. L. Wald Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, United States, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States, Computer Science and AI Lab (CSAIL), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States 

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