Identifying and Describing Pattern and Process in the Evolution of Hominin Use of Fire

@article{Sandgathe2017IdentifyingAD,
  title={Identifying and Describing Pattern and Process in the Evolution of Hominin Use of Fire},
  author={Dennis Sandgathe},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2017},
  volume={58},
  pages={S360 - S370}
}
  • D. Sandgathe
  • Published 17 May 2017
  • Environmental Science
  • Current Anthropology
Although research relating to Paleolithic fire use has a long history, it has seen a particular resurgence in the last decade. This has been fueled in part by improved analytical techniques, improved standards of data collection and reporting, and the discovery of new sites with important fire residues in Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. A major component of this new research has been to identify when “controlled use” and “habitual use” of fire developed among Pleistocene hominins. However… 
Recognizing Fire in the Paleolithic Archaeological Record
Everyone agrees that fire has played an important part in the history of the genus Homo. However, because of the sometimes ephemeral and ambiguous nature of the evidence for fire in the Paleolithic
Fire and the Genus Homo
Employing fire as an adaptive aid represents one of the most important technological developments in the course of hominin evolution, and, not surprisingly, research into the prehistoric use of fire
Spatial Analysis of Fire
The use of fire by early hominins is considered a significant technological and cultural revolution. Recently, the study of fire use has been affected by a troublesome trend that views chemical and
Investigating variability in the frequency of fire use in the archaeological record of Late Pleistocene Europe
The primary focus of this paper is to examine the extent to which the pattern of Neandertal fire use in southwest France occurred at other times and places during the European Late Pleistocene. In
How Did Hominins Adapt to Ice Age Europe without Fire?
Analyses of archaeological material recovered from several Middle Paleolithic sites in southwest France have provided strong corroborating data on Neanderthal use of fire. Both direct and indirect
A Cross-cultural Survey of On-site Fire Use by Recent Hunter-gatherers: Implications for Research on Palaeolithic Pyrotechnology
The ability to control fire clearly had a significant impact on human evolution, but when and how hominins developed this ability remains poorly understood. Improving our understanding of the history
Evidence of Burning from Bushfires in Southern and East Africa and Its Relevance to Hominin Evolution
Early human fire use is of great scientific interest, but little comparative work has been undertaken across the ecological settings in which natural fire occurs or on the taphonomy of fire and
Geochemical Evidence for the Control of Fire by Middle Palaeolithic Hominins
TLDR
The results suggest that the ability of hominins to manipulate fire independent of exploitation of wildfires was spatially variable in the MP and may have developed multiple times in the genus Homo.
Middle Pleistocene fire use: The first signal of widespread cultural diffusion in human evolution
TLDR
This work interprets the archaeological signal of fire use from around 400,000 y ago as representing the earliest clear-cut case of widespread cultural change resulting from diffusion in human evolution, and suggests a form of cultural behavior significantly more similar to that of extant Homo sapiens than to the authors' great ape relatives.
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Everyone agrees that fire has played an important part in the history of the genus Homo. However, because of the sometimes ephemeral and ambiguous nature of the evidence for fire in the Paleolithic
Fire and the Genus Homo
Employing fire as an adaptive aid represents one of the most important technological developments in the course of hominin evolution, and, not surprisingly, research into the prehistoric use of fire
On the earliest evidence for habitual use of fire in Europe
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How Did Hominins Adapt to Ice Age Europe without Fire?
Analyses of archaeological material recovered from several Middle Paleolithic sites in southwest France have provided strong corroborating data on Neanderthal use of fire. Both direct and indirect
Earliest fire in Africa: towards the convergence of archaeological evidence and the cooking hypothesis
Issues of early fire use have become topical in human evolution, after a long period in which fire scarcely featured in general texts. Interest has been stimulated by new archaeological finds in
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