Identifying Risk Factors for Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Among Infants Born After 33 Through 35 Completed Weeks of Gestation: Different Methodologies Yield Consistent Findings

@article{CarbonellEstrany2004IdentifyingRF,
  title={Identifying Risk Factors for Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Among Infants Born After 33 Through 35 Completed Weeks of Gestation: Different Methodologies Yield Consistent Findings},
  author={Xavier Carbonell‐Estrany and Josep Figueras-Aloy and Barbara J. Law},
  journal={The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal},
  year={2004},
  volume={23},
  pages={S193-S201}
}
Background: Prematurity is a proven risk factor for severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Prematurity leads to an increased need for, and duration of, hospital admission, intensive care, mechanical ventilation and supplemental oxygen, as well as increased mortality. Methods: The Pediatric Investigators Collaborative Network on Infections in Canada (PICNIC) study was a prospective, multicenter, cohort study conducted in 16 regions across Canada during 2 successive RSV seasons… Expand
FLIP-2 Study: Risk Factors Linked to Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Requiring Hospitalization in Premature Infants Born in Spain at a Gestational Age of 32 to 35 Weeks
TLDR
Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the risk of RSV-related respiratory infection requiring hospital admission in preterm infants (32–35 WGA) was associated with the following factors: absolute chronologic age of ≤10 weeks at the onset ofRSV season, presence of school-age siblings or day care attendance and smoking during pregnancy. Expand
Increased Risk for Respiratory Syncytial Virus-associated, Community-acquired Alveolar Pneumonia in Infants Born at 31–36 Weeks of Gestation
TLDR
Children <24-month-old born at 31–36 weeksGA are at increased risk for hospitalization and PICU admission for both overall CAAP and RSV-associated CAAP compared with those born at >36 weeks GA. Expand
[Usefulness of different risk factor associations in predicting admissions due to respiratory syncytial virus in premature newborns of 32 to 35 weeks gestation in Spain].
TLDR
Usefulness of different risk factor associations to predict hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus infection in preterm infants 32 to 35 weeks gestation in Spain is low, although similar to other models. Expand
Estimating Respiratory Syncytial Virus-associated Hospitalization in the First Year of Life Among Infants Born at 32–35 Weeks of Gestation
TLDR
A scoring tool to estimate local risk of RSV-H in the first year of life among moderately premature infants to assist in prophylaxis decision making and could be used in anticipatory care to help educate families about reducing risk of serious RSV illness in their newborn. Expand
Risk-Scoring Tool for respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis in premature infants born at 33–35 completed weeks’ gestational age in Canada*
TLDR
The RST is a practical, easy-to-use instrument to guide judicious RSV prophylaxis for moderate–high-risk, 33–35-week GA infants who range from low to high risk by evaluating the subsequent incidence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections resulting in emergency room (ER) visits and hospitalization. Expand
The evolution of risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus-related hospitalisation in infants born at 32–35 weeks’ gestational age: time-based analysis using data from the FLIP-2 study
TLDR
The risk of RSV hospitalisation appears to persist to at least 5–6 months old in 32–35 wGA infants, which has implications for the optimal management of disease prevention. Expand
Prospective Validation of a Prognostic Model for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis in Late Preterm Infants: A Multicenter Birth Cohort Study
TLDR
The authors' prospectively validated prediction rule identifies infants at increased RSV hospitalization risk, who may benefit from targeted preventive interventions and can facilitate country-specific, cost-effective use of RSV prophylaxis in late preterm infants. Expand
Clinical relevance of prevention of respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection in preterm infants born between 33 and 35 weeks gestational age
TLDR
The causes and consequences of RSV LRTI in infants born 33–35 weeks GAA were determined via literature review, and the potential for using risk factors to identify high risk infants and optimise prophylaxis was looked at. Expand
Respiratory syncytial virus risk factors in late preterm infants
  • M. Lanari, M. Silvestri, G. Rossi
  • Medicine
  • The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians
  • 2009
TLDR
On the basis of the finding that among nations the difference for severe RSV may exist in environmental and demographic risk factors, an ‘International’ tool has been developed based on the data from the Spanish FLIP study to predict the likelihood of RSV-hospitalization in newborns 33–35 WGA. Expand
Respiratory Syncytial Virus-associated hospitalization in premature infants who did not receive palivizumab prophylaxis in Italy: a retrospective analysis from the Osservatorio Study
TLDR
The hospitalized-to-not-hospitalized ratios and RSV+ frequency in the first 12 months of age in infants born prematurely confirm the vulnerability of these children for clinically important RSV infection, most notably in the <32 wGA category. Expand
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Case-Control Study of the Risk Factors Linked to Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Requiring Hospitalization in Premature Infants Born at a Gestational Age of 33–35 Weeks in Spain
TLDR
In premature infants born 33–35 WGA, certain underlying risk factors significantly increase the risk of RSV-related respiratory infection and hospitalization, and Premature infants with additional risk factors should be considered for RSV prophylaxis with palivizumab. Expand
The Pediatric Investigators Collaborative Network on Infections in Canada Study of Predictors of Hospitalization for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection for Infants Born at 33 Through 35 Completed Weeks of Gestation
TLDR
Specific host/environmental factors can be used to identify which 33-35GA infants are at greatest risk of hospitalization for RSV infection and likely to benefit from palivizumab prophylaxis. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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