Identification of recent hybridization between gray wolves and domesticated dogs by SNP genotyping

@article{vonHoldt2012IdentificationOR,
  title={Identification of recent hybridization between gray wolves and domesticated dogs by SNP genotyping},
  author={Bridgett M. vonHoldt and John P. Pollinger and Dent Earl and Heidi G. Parker and Elaine A. Ostrander and Robert K. Wayne},
  journal={Mammalian Genome},
  year={2012},
  volume={24},
  pages={80-88}
}
The ability to detect recent hybridization between dogs and wolves is important for conservation and legal actions, which often require accurate and rapid resolution of ancestry. The availability of a genetic test for dog–wolf hybrids would greatly support federal and legal enforcement efforts, particularly when the individual in question lacks prior ancestry information. We have developed a panel of 100 unlinked ancestry-informative SNP markers that can detect mixed ancestry within up to four… 
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TLDR
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