Identification of protein pheromones that promote aggressive behaviour

@article{Chamero2007IdentificationOP,
  title={Identification of protein pheromones that promote aggressive behaviour},
  author={P. Chamero and Tobias F Marton and D. Logan and K. Flanagan and Jason R. Cruz and A. Saghatelian and B. Cravatt and L. Stowers},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2007},
  volume={450},
  pages={899-902}
}
Mice use pheromones, compounds emitted and detected by members of the same species, as cues to regulate social behaviours such as pup suckling, aggression and mating. Neurons that detect pheromones are thought to reside in at least two separate organs within the nasal cavity: the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). Each pheromone ligand is thought to activate a dedicated subset of these sensory neurons. However, the nature of the pheromone cues and the identity of… Expand
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