Identification of a Triterpenoid Saponin from a Crucifer, Barbarea vulgaris, as a Feeding Deterrent to the Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella

@article{Shinoda2004IdentificationOA,
  title={Identification of a Triterpenoid Saponin from a Crucifer, Barbarea vulgaris, as a Feeding Deterrent to the Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella},
  author={Tetsuro Shinoda and Tsuneatsu Nagao and Masayoshi Nakayama and Hiroaki Serizawa and Masaji Koshioka and Hikaru Okabe and Akira Kawai},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={28},
  pages={587-599}
}
Larvae of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, a crucifer specialist, refuse to feed on a crucifer, Barbarea vulgaris, because of the presence of a feeding deterrent, which is extractable with chloroform. We isolated a feeding deterrent from B. vulgaris leaves, by successive fractionations with silica-gel, ODS, i.e., C18 reversed phase, and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatographies, and ODS-HPLC, guided by a bioassay for feeding deterrent activity. The structure of the compound was… 
A Saponin Correlated with Variable Resistance of Barbarea vulgaris to the Diamondback Moth Plutella xylostella
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The decrease in resistance of the G-type in the fall was correlated with a decrease in the level of 1, and it is concluded that 1 is correlated with the variable resistance of B. vulgaris foliage to the DBM.
Phylloplane location of glucosinolates in Barbarea spp. (Brassicaceae) and misleading assessment of host suitability by a specialist herbivore.
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This research is the first to show that glucosinolates are present on the leaf surface of Barbarea spp.
Role of Saponins in Plant Defense against the Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella (L.)
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TLDR
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Can sulfur fertilisation improve the effectiveness of trap crops for diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae)?
TLDR
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Transcriptome Analysis of Barbarea vulgaris Infested with Diamondback Moth (Plutella xylostella) Larvae
TLDR
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Antifeedant Activities of Organic Fractions from Cestrum parqui Leaves on the Red-Haired Bark Beetle Hylurgus ligniperda
TLDR
Assessment of the feeding behavior of H. ligniperda through the artificial diet supplemented with organic fractions obtained from Cestrum parqui leaves found that leaf extracts show a great potential for being used for controlling H. L. lIGNiperda and thus to diminish the use of harmful synthetic pesticide.
Laboratory evaluations of a wild crucifer Barbarea vulgaris as a management tool for the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae).
TLDR
Results demonstrate that B. vulgaris has a great potential as a dead-end trap crop for improving management of P. xylostella and ways to utilize this plant are proposed.
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