Identification of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato genes induced during infection of Arabidopsis thaliana

@article{Boch2002IdentificationOP,
  title={Identification of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato genes induced
 during infection of Arabidopsis thaliana},
  author={Jens Boch and Vinita S. Joardar and Lisa Wei Gao and Tara L. Robertson and Melisa T S Lim and Barbara N. Kunkel},
  journal={Molecular Microbiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={44}
}
Phytopathogenic bacteria possess a large number of genes that allow them to grow and cause disease on plants. Many of these genes should be induced when the bacteria come in contact with plant tissue. We used a modified in vivo expression technology (IVET) approach to identify genes from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato that are induced upon infection of Arabidopsis thaliana and isolated over 500 in planta‐expressed (ipx) promoter fusions. Sequence analysis of 79 fusions… Expand
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