Identification of Causal Effects Using Instrumental Variables

@inproceedings{Angrist1993IdentificationOC,
  title={Identification of Causal Effects Using Instrumental Variables},
  author={Joshua David Angrist and Guido Imbens and Donald B. Rubin},
  year={1993}
}
Abstract We outline a framework for causal inference in settings where assignment to a binary treatment is ignorable, but compliance with the assignment is not perfect so that the receipt of treatment is nonignorable. To address the problems associated with comparing subjects by the ignorable assignment—an “intention-to-treat analysis”—we make use of instrumental variables, which have long been used by economists in the context of regression models with constant treatment effects. We show that… Expand
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