Identification of Background False Positives from Kepler Data

@article{Bryson2013IdentificationOB,
  title={Identification of Background False Positives from Kepler Data},
  author={Stephen T. Bryson and Jon M. Jenkins and Ronald L. Gilliland and Joseph D. Twicken and Bruce D. Clarke and Jason F. Rowe and Douglas A. Caldwell and Natalie M. Batalha and Fergal Robert Mullally and Michael R. Haas and Peter Tenenbaum},
  journal={Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific},
  year={2013},
  volume={125},
  pages={889 - 923}
}
The Kepler Mission was launched on 2009 March 6 to perform a photometric survey of more than 100,000 dwarf stars to search for Earth-size planets with the transit technique. The reliability of the resulting planetary candidate list relies on the ability to identify and remove false positives. Major sources of astrophysical false positives are planetary transits and stellar eclipses on background stars. We describe several new techniques for the identification of background transit sources that… 

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