Identification and characterization of fast- and slow-growing root nodule bacteria from South-Western Australian soils able to nodulate Acacia saligna

@article{Marsudi1999IdentificationAC,
  title={Identification and characterization of fast- and slow-growing root nodule bacteria from South-Western Australian soils able to nodulate Acacia saligna},
  author={Nada D.S Marsudi and A. Glenn and M. Dilworth},
  journal={Soil Biology \& Biochemistry},
  year={1999},
  volume={31},
  pages={1229-1238}
}
Abstract A total of 133 root nodule bacterial strains were isolated from nodules of Acacia saligna growing in soils from nine geographically separate locations in South-Western Australia; 40 were characterized on the basis of their growth and physiology and 20 by 16 S rRNA sequence analysis. Thirty-nine strains were fast-growing rhizobia, and 94 slow-growing bradyrhizobia. The latter were essentially acid-tolerant, alkali-sensitive and salt-sensitive, while the former varied in acid-tolerance… Expand
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