Identifiability, Performance Feedback and the Köhler Effect

@article{Kerr2005IdentifiabilityPF,
  title={Identifiability, Performance Feedback and the K{\"o}hler Effect},
  author={Norbert L. Kerr and Lawrence A. Mess{\'e} and Ernest S. Park and Eric J. Sambolec},
  journal={Group Processes \& Intergroup Relations},
  year={2005},
  volume={8},
  pages={375 - 390}
}
Research, starting with Köhler (1926), has demonstrated a type of group motivation gain, wherein the less capable member of a dyad working conjunctively at a persistence task works harder than comparable individuals. To explore possible boundary conditions of this effect, the current experiment systematically varied the amount and timing of performance feedback group members received. Results showed: (a) continuous feedback of both members’ performance was not necessary for producing the effect… 

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