IcsA, a polarly localized autotransporter with an atypical signal peptide, uses the Sec apparatus for secretion, although the Sec apparatus is circumferentially distributed.

@article{Brandon2003IcsAAP,
  title={IcsA, a polarly localized autotransporter with an atypical signal peptide, uses the Sec apparatus for secretion, although the Sec apparatus is circumferentially distributed.},
  author={Lauren D Brandon and Nathan W. Goehring and Anuradha Janakiraman and Arthur W. Yan and Tong Wu and Jon et Beckwith and Marcia B. Goldberg},
  journal={Molecular microbiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={50 1},
  pages={45-60}
}
Asymmetric localization of proteins is essential to many biological functions of bacteria. Shigella IcsA, an outer membrane protein, is localized to the old pole of the bacillus, where it mediates assembly of a polarized actin tail during infection of mammalian cells. Actin tail assembly provides the propulsive force for intracellular movement and intercellular dissemination. Localization of IcsA to the pole is independent of the amino-terminal signal peptide (Charles, M., Perez, M., Kobil, J.H… CONTINUE READING