Ice core and palaeoclimatic evidence for the timing and nature of the great mid‐13th century volcanic eruption

@article{Oppenheimer2003IceCA,
  title={Ice core and palaeoclimatic evidence for the timing and nature of the great mid‐13th century volcanic eruption},
  author={Clive Oppenheimer},
  journal={International Journal of Climatology},
  year={2003},
  volume={23}
}
  • C. Oppenheimer
  • Published 30 March 2003
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • International Journal of Climatology
Ice cores from both the Arctic and Antarctic record a massive volcanic eruption in around AD 1258. The inter‐hemispheric transport of ash and sulphate aerosol suggests a low‐latitude explosive eruption, but the volcano responsible is not known. This is remarkable given estimates of the magnitude of the event, which range up to 5 × 1014–2 × 1015 kg (∼200–800 km3 of dense magma), which would make this the largest eruption of the historic period, and one of the very largest of the Holocene. The… 

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