Ice Nucleation, Propagation, and Deep Supercooling in Woody Plants

@article{Wisniewski2004IceNP,
  title={Ice Nucleation, Propagation, and Deep Supercooling in Woody Plants},
  author={Michael Wisniewski and Michael P Fuller and Jiwan Palta and John V. Carter and Rajeev Arora},
  journal={Journal of Crop Improvement},
  year={2004},
  volume={10},
  pages={16 - 5}
}
Summary The response of woody plants to freezing temperatures is complex. Species vary greatly in their ability to survive freezing temperatures and the resulting dehydrative and mechanical stresses that occur as a result from the presence of ice. Initially, this is presented by the ability to inhibit the formation of ice (ice nucleation) by supercooling. Significant questions exist about the role of internal and external ice nucleating agents in determining the extent to which any particular… 
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