Ibn Sina and the Clinical Trial

@article{Sajadi2009IbnSA,
  title={Ibn Sina and the Clinical Trial},
  author={M. Sajadi and D. Mansouri},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2009},
  volume={150},
  pages={640-643}
}
Key Summary Points Although the era of formal experimentation with drugs is thought to have begun with James Lind in the 18th century, there is evidence of human trials before that. The ancient Greeks, Romans, and Persians carried out experiments with poisons and antidotes. In the 10th century, a Persian physician by the name of Razi described the first-known use of a control group in a human trial. Ibn Sina, an 11th-century Persian physician, wrote the earliest known treatise relating to… Expand
Experimental medicine 1000 years ago
Avicenna’s View on the Etiologies of Intestinal Obstruction
The 4 Humors and Erythrocyte Sedimentation: The Most Influential Observation in Medical History
  • I. Kushner
  • Medicine
  • The American journal of the medical sciences
  • 2013
History of Anesthesia and Pain in Old Iranian Texts
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 21 REFERENCES
Ibn Sina's Canon of Medicine: 11th century rules for assessing the effects of drugs
Avicenna (AD 980–1037) and Arabic perinatal medicine
  • P. Dunn
  • Medicine
  • Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition
  • 1997
Al-Razi and Islamic medicine in the 9th century.
Jules Gavarret's Principes Généraux de Statistique Médicale
  • Edward Huth
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
  • 2008
The Drug Trade in Antiquity
  • V. Nutton
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
  • 1985
An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine
  • S. Burger
  • Medicine
  • The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-Honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha
  • 1985
An Introduction to the History of Medicine
Avicenna, his life and works
...
1
2
3
...