Ibn Sina (Avicenna) on Pathogenesis of Migraine Compared With the Recent Theories

@article{Abokrysha2009IbnS,
  title={Ibn Sina (Avicenna) on Pathogenesis of Migraine Compared With the Recent Theories},
  author={Noha t. Abokrysha},
  journal={Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain},
  year={2009},
  volume={49}
}
  • Noha t. Abokrysha
  • Published 1 June 2009
  • Medicine
  • Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain
From its dramatic rise in the seventh century, Islamic civilization has covered a large part of the globe, incorporating many subcultures and languages into its orbit (http:// www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/arabic/med_islam.html). Islamic medicine typifies that experience, being built on the theoretical and practical knowledge first developed in Greece and Rome. For Islamic scholars, Galen (d. ca. 210 AD) and Hippocrates (fifth century BC) were pre-eminent authorities, followed by Hellenic scholars in… 

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The experiments described here were performed when the phenomena which characterize the onset of an attack, namely, scotomas, blurring of vision, paresthesias and aphasia, had already passed and had been supplanted by headache, so these results have no bearing on preheadache phenomena.

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SummaryTheories of migraine pathophysiology have evolved from the realms of the supernatural into the scientific arena but their further evolution seems delayed by unproductive controversy about

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