Ibn Al Nafis: His Seminal Contributions to Cardiology

@article{Numan2014IbnAN,
  title={Ibn Al Nafis: His Seminal Contributions to Cardiology},
  author={Mohammed T. Numan},
  journal={Pediatric Cardiology},
  year={2014},
  volume={35},
  pages={1088-1090}
}
  • M. Numan
  • Published 6 August 2014
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Pediatric Cardiology
Ibn Al Nafis, born 1213, was the first to discover the “circulation lesser” and describe the blood flow from the right ventricle to the lungs then back to the left ventricle 300 years before William Harvey. He bravely rejected the theory of Galen (130–200 AD) and Avicenna (980–1037 AD) which stated that the blood from the right ventricle passes through “invisible” holes in the ventricular septum to the left ventricle. Also was the first to note that the nourishment of the heart muscle is coming… 
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References

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Ibn An-Nafîs (XIIIth Cent.) and His Theory of the Lesser Circulation
SISTRATOS, lIlrd Cent. B. C.) succeeded in forming an approximate idea of the anatomical conditions of the vessels connecting heart and lungs. TPhis knowledge was widened by the physiological
Thirteenth century physician interprets connections between arteries and veins.
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Thirteenth Century physician interprets connection between arteries and veins : Sudhoffs Arch
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A Latin translation of Ibn Nafis (1547) related to the problem of the circulation of the blood.
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