• Corpus ID: 6225544

IS LONG-TERM RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT EFFECTIVE FOR ADOLESCENTS? A TREATMENT OUTCOME STUDY

@inproceedings{Shapiro2002ISLR,
  title={IS LONG-TERM RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT EFFECTIVE FOR ADOLESCENTS? A TREATMENT OUTCOME STUDY},
  author={Valerie B. Shapiro},
  year={2002}
}
There is a lack of research concerning the effectiveness of residential treatment for troubled adolescents. Due to a focus on internal controls in this area of research, there has been no conclusion as to how helpful such treatment is for real world clients. This is an effectiveness study that serves as a preliminary outcome evaluation for the Academy at Swift River, an emotional growth boarding school in Cummington, Massachusetts. Both the program graduates and their parents completed detailed… 

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