IPM in the transgenic era: a review of the challenges from emerging pests in Australian cotton systems

@article{Wilson2013IPMIT,
  title={IPM in the transgenic era: a review of the challenges from emerging pests in Australian cotton systems},
  author={Lewis J. Wilson and S Downes and Moazzem Khan and Mary E. A. Whitehouse and Geoff H Baker and Paul R. Grundy and Susan Maas},
  journal={Crop and Pasture Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={64},
  pages={737 - 749}
}
Abstract. The Cotton Catchment Communities Cooperative Research Centre began during a period of rapid uptake of Bollgard II® cotton, which contains genes to express two Bt proteins that control the primary pests of cotton in Australia, Helicoverpa armigera and H. punctigera. The dramatic uptake of this technology presumably resulted in strong selection pressure for resistance in Helicoverpa spp. against the Bt proteins. The discovery of higher than expected levels of resistance in both… Expand
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