INTRASPECIFIC VARIATION IN THE SPATIAL AND SOCIAL ORGANIZATION OF THE AFRICAN STRIPED MOUSE

@inproceedings{Schradin2005INTRASPECIFICVI,
  title={INTRASPECIFIC VARIATION IN THE SPATIAL AND SOCIAL ORGANIZATION OF THE AFRICAN STRIPED MOUSE},
  author={C. Schradin and N. Pillay},
  year={2005}
}
Abstract Social flexibility, that is, the expression of different types of social systems within one species, has been reported in several mammalian taxa, including rodents. However, sociality in rodents has been studied mostly in captivity and the results are often regarded as laboratory artifacts. We present field data for 2 populations of the striped mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio), a diurnal muroid rodent from southern Africa. The 2 populations inhabit different environments and demonstrate… Expand
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TLDR
The medium sized, diurnal muroid rodent, the striped mouse, is discussed, which demonstrates a high level of intraspecific variability of its social system, and it is suggested that the main ecological reasons for these differences in social organization are food abundance, the availability of suitable nesting sites, and the possibility of sun-basking. Expand
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The medium sized, diurnal muroid rodent, the striped mouse, is discussed, which demonstrates a high level of intraspecific variability of its social system, and it is suggested that the main ecological reasons for these differences in social organization are food abundance, the availability of suitable nesting sites, and the possibility of sun-basking. Expand
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